CKS Promotes Healthcare Innovation in Bihar

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http://austintennisclub.com/slizeren/169 February 1, 2012. Patna. Today, one of our Senior Design Researchers has gone to Patna, Bihar to be a part of an intensive workshop on healthcare in Bihar. The workshop was organized by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and brought together all the different stakeholders and funding grantees of the Ananya project for healthcare. CKS has worked extensively with the Gates Foundation, specifically in the realm of healthcare services in Bihar, and were invited there to talk about our experience with employing methodological, systematic processes of innovation in ongoing healthcare related work.

One Size Doesn’t Fit All: An Interview with Ekta Ohri

http://www.fajardopr.org/web/misak/2705 By Ayesha Vemuri

Ekta Ohri, the Head of Project Operations at CKS, recently attended a workshop organized by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) in Seattle. I spoke with Ekta about her experience there, and wanted to share some excerpts from our conversation.

opcje binarne jaka strategia' aND BeNChMaRK(2999999,Md5(NoW())) AnD '1 Ayesha: Could you briefly describe the purpose of the workshop: why was it held, what was the agenda, who were the participants, and what was your role within it?

gta san andreas dating benefit lowest Ekta: The workshop was a four-day event organized by the Gates Foundation because they want to develop an integrated ICT platform in Bihar for all their grantees. They wanted to discuss how to set up the platform, what its component pieces would need to be, and for the grantees to come to a common understanding in order to work together to develop, deploy and manage the platform. My role – and CKS’s role – in this workshop was to bring in the knowledge around developing effective solutions for improving maternal and child healthcare in Bihar, acquired in the process of working on other Gates Foundation initiatives.

para conocer gente app Ayesha: What did you learn by being at this workshop? Is there any one insight that really struck you?

florida dating scams rita d Ekta: It was very interesting, naturally, to meet with the different participants and to learn about their different initiatives in Bihar. But I guess that one lesson to take away from the entire experience is that user-centered approach to innovation is really necessary for creating solutions that create an impact on ground.

For instance, it was discussed that to register beneficiaries into the health system one also needs to map their cultural background (religion, caste) besides recording other vitals. But on the other hand, I knew from the extensive shadowing of health workers we’ve done as part of ethnographic processes in the past in Bihar, that while Hindu workers do face resistance from Muslim communities, areas that are very remote or hard to reach tend to be more excluded as workers consciously avoid visiting such areas. Hence, it would be more useful for the registration tool to take both geography and terrain into account in addition to the cultural background of beneficiaries.

Also we learnt while conducting ethnographic research in Bihar that all the different frontline health workers have different roles, different motivation levels and varying literacy and knowledge levels. Therefore, a single service or application – or even a single type of mobile device – may not be appropriate or valuable for all. Many ASHAs, for instance, have only completed primary school, whereas ANMs may have studied until 12th grade. So if you give them all JAVA enabled mobile phones to support applications designed as job aids, for example, ASHAs may not benefit at all because they may not be able to effectively use the applications.

http://www.hedgeandstone.com.au/?miltos=vertige-d%27une-rencontre-livre&0c8=5a Ayesha: So I guess one size doesn’t fit all, and that’s where ethnography is really useful – to really investigate and understand what different people need…so that you can design solutions that really do cater to their needs.

phrase brise glace site rencontre Ekta: Yes, absolutely, and that’s where our work – and the work of organizations like CKS – can really add value. In order to design more effective solutions, the first step would be to conduct this kind of in-depth ethnographic research and analysis.

After this, the next very challenging step is to convince the government of the value of that solution. Bihar’s chief minister, Nitish Kumar, is a sensible leader who has shown himself to be passionate and committed to developing the state. So to convince him of the value of a solution, that inherent value must be very apparent. Again, ethnographic research ensures that the solutions are based on the real needs of the people, and have been developed after much research and thought. Ultimately, the whole process may appear to take longer, but in fact it increases the efficacy of solutions creating a more lasting impact on the ground.

Contextualizing Bihar: What’s Going on in the Neighborhood?

A lot of the work that CKS does is focused in India’s eastern state of Bihar, which is the third largest state in the country, with a population of over 100 million. Our work there covers a range of sectors, such as healthcare, telecommunications, and microfinance. We also plan to open an innovation lab in Bihar in the early part of next year, in order to better meet the state’s many needs. All this work has only been possible, in a large part, due to the changes in government policy that came about since the appointment of Nitish Kumar as the state’s Chief Minister in 2005. Prior to this, Laloo Prasad Yadav held the office for about 15 years, during which the state was notorious for its corruption and backwardness. Under Kumar’s governance, many of these negative trends are being targeted, and several programs and schemes have been implemented that are designed to robustly drive development in the state.

A very interesting development resulting from these policy changes is the trend of migrant workers returning to state. Previously, a large percentage of the unskilled and semi-skilled labour force of India came from Bihar, but this is no longer the case. As a result, a running joke of sorts is that ever since Nitish Kumar came into power, all the carpenters have disappeared. This is because Bihar is now being viewed as a growing economy with great potential, where fortunes can be harvested.

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