Innovation works best when government does least?

single wien kostenlos The question of the nature of government’s role in social issues and the market has been debated to an impasse. So too, it seems, has its role in innovation. Does government support foster innovation? Or, does innovation work best when government does least? In 2010, the Economist magazine hosted a debate between the two camps, and fleshed out the arguments for greater or lesser contributions by government to the process of innovation.

punk speed dating Defending the theory that innovation works best when government does least, Amar Bhide of Harvard University and author of The Venturesome Economy argues that too-involved governments inevitably muddle the innovation process; they choose the wrong winner by supporting projects that are politically popular, as opposed to those deserving of investment. [Read more…]

New NESTA Report on Innovation in India

hop over to this site Can growth of higher education keep up with India’s human potential? Can India’s low cost innovations disrupt the global economy? What effects do abstract social and creative innovations have in the Indian context? These are some of the questions that NESTA, in partnership with the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, UK Research Councils, and the UK-India Education and Research Initiative, are looking to answer.

chico busca chico lanzarote NESTA’s recent publication on Innovation in India is a survey on the changing landscape of research and innovation in the Indian environment. Meant to be a resource for policymakers, higher education institutions, and innovative companies seeking partners in India, the intensive study is based on interviews with individuals in fields of policy, business, education, research and civil society. Using these interviews and the latest data, the report notes trends as well as provides insight into critical issues in India’s innovation trajectory, finally asking if India will achieve its ambitious innovation goals, and what it will mean for the rest of the world.

stier mann dating This NESTA report builds on the work done by the think tank Demos, in their publication Atlas of Ideas. In particular it draws from India: the uneven innovator, by Kirsten Bound, who now works with NESTA. After spending five years as a senior researcher at Demos, where she focused on democracy and innovation in India and Brazil, Bound worked for Tony Blair’s Africa Governance Initiative in Rwanda advising the Prime Minister on policy delivery. She consulted for the World Bank’s International Finance Corporation on Investment Climate Reform, and in 2009 joined NESTA as a Lead Policy Advisor on Innovation Systems. Her published works include: Brazil: the natural knowledge economy, The Everyday Democracy Index, Mapping Governance at the Local Level, and Community Participation: Who Benefits? She has also has created several series of forums designed to increase communication and learning to create spaces for new and innovative ideas in the European context. Kirsten was in Delhi earlier this week and spent lunch talking with Aditya Dev Sood about innovation in India and Design Public III. We at CKS are very hopeful for her insight and expertise at the next edition of Design Public.

China’s Need for Innovation

her comment is here Minxin Pei, professor of government at Clairmont McKenna College in California recently wrote an article “Nixon Then, China Now” explaining China’s weaknesses hindering its ability to truly compete as a world power. He argues that China’s one-party regime results in the inability to innovate and keeps it from being a true contender against the minds and ideas of the West and Japan.

read Since Nixon’s visit in 1972, China has emerged from its self-imposed isolation to become a rival power to dominant industrialized countries politically, economically, and militarily. It has strategically exploiting the benefits of free trade, and it is often remarked that China may soon take the place of the United States as the hegemonic power in the international system. However Pei argues that China is unprepared for deeper integration with the globalized world.
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Contextualizing Bihar: What’s Going on in the Neighborhood?

A lot of the work that CKS does is focused in India’s eastern state of Bihar, which is the third largest state in the country, with a population of over 100 million. Our work there covers a range of sectors, such as healthcare, telecommunications, and microfinance. We also plan to open an innovation lab in Bihar in the early part of next year, in order to better meet the state’s many needs. All this work has only been possible, in a large part, due to the changes in government policy that came about since the appointment of Nitish Kumar as the state’s Chief Minister in 2005. Prior to this, Laloo Prasad Yadav held the office for about 15 years, during which the state was notorious for its corruption and backwardness. Under Kumar’s governance, many of these negative trends are being targeted, and several programs and schemes have been implemented that are designed to robustly drive development in the state.

A very interesting development resulting from these policy changes is the trend of migrant workers returning to state. Previously, a large percentage of the unskilled and semi-skilled labour force of India came from Bihar, but this is no longer the case. As a result, a running joke of sorts is that ever since Nitish Kumar came into power, all the carpenters have disappeared. This is because Bihar is now being viewed as a growing economy with great potential, where fortunes can be harvested.

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