IBM Officially On Board as Sponsor for Design Public

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http://joshuapricemusic.net/63547-ranitidine-liquid-where-to-buy.html transpose We’re elated to report that yesterday, IBM officially confirmed their sponsorship of the third edition of the Design Public Conclave. Our CEO, Dr. Aditya Dev Sood, has been in conversation with the folks at IBM for the past month or so now, discussing areas of mutual interest and opportunities for collaboration. The focus of the conclave is on how governments as well as private corporations can increase trust in the public sphere, and in doing so help build a culture of innovation in India. IBM has been at the helm of innovation in several different arenas, and most recently have been focused on urban infrastructure and smart cities, highly relevant themes in the context of building more trust and participation through better design and innovation.

https://bristolquakers.org.uk/drova/9741 Smart Cities are cities that know how to “leverage information, anticipate problems and coordinate resources.” The smartest cities integrate and coordinate between all key functions and infrastructures. [Read more…]

China’s Need for Innovation

dating munich english Minxin Pei, professor of government at Clairmont McKenna College in California recently wrote an article “Nixon Then, China Now” explaining China’s weaknesses hindering its ability to truly compete as a world power. He argues that China’s one-party regime results in the inability to innovate and keeps it from being a true contender against the minds and ideas of the West and Japan.

rencontre forum telephone Since Nixon’s visit in 1972, China has emerged from its self-imposed isolation to become a rival power to dominant industrialized countries politically, economically, and militarily. It has strategically exploiting the benefits of free trade, and it is often remarked that China may soon take the place of the United States as the hegemonic power in the international system. However Pei argues that China is unprepared for deeper integration with the globalized world.
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Transforming Field Research with New Technologies

online dating cape breton Yesterday, I became the proud owner of a 4GB Echo™ Smartpen, a brilliant new piece of equipment that could offer immense benefits to researchers, journalists, or anyone else who needs to take quick, but often voluminous, notes. Upon arrival, the pen created a great deal of excitement in the office, filled with researchers constantly burdened with the exhausting task of long audio transcripts and over-filled field diaries, who were elated to see a device that would make recording as well as revisiting data substantially easier.

site de rencontre pour jeune sans inscription The Echo Smart pen has a number of features that make it such a boon: it has an excellent audio recorder that captures notes with perfect clarity, and features a fairly high-quality built-in speaker to play back your recorded audio in addition to the usual headphone jack. It has a built-in USB port, which makes the transfer of audio files to your computer much easier. But the seriously genius aspect to this pen is an infrared camera built into the tip of the pen, which allows you to begin, pause and end recording by tapping on an icon printed onto the pages of a special notebook provided by the manufacturer. The same camera also allows you to play back your recording from a specific point by tapping a particular point in your handwritten notes, and even to save the notes as a PDF directly onto your computer. The PDF, too, is an interactive document, allowing one to click on any point in the text to play back the associated audio recording.

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http://www.commune-cailly.fr/filoime/krepost/3623 Usually, field researchers jot their notes in handwritten format, while the audio is captured separately. Digitizing handwritten notes, transcribing audio and then going back and forth between the two is often very time consuming. With this pen, however, one can take handwritten notes on the special notebook and the audio is captured alongside. Once the PDFs are downloaded, each page could have multiple notes and audio recordings attached, and would allow one to review and navigate through their notes with much greater ease.

http://www.newmen.eu/mysoroj/viosa/1657 The EchoSmart Pen is an excellent example of the kind of innovation that could potentially transform the way we work, substantially reduce the time, energy and resources spent on recording data, and all the while make it easier for us to collect, manage, store and analyze information. It is an example of an intelligent design that could enable and speed-up future innovations and designs.

Happy Birthday to Us: 10 Years of CKS

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http://www.comitesdepistagecancers.fr/ployka/5298 It has sneaked up on us, but CKS is 10 years old today. I conducted an interview with our Founder and CEO, Dr. Aditya Dev Sood, on how the company’s journey has progressed over this past decade, and where he sees it going in the future.
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Ayesha Vemuri:
How did it all begin? What have you accomplished in this time? 
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Aditya Dev Sood:
We conventionally date the company back to February 9, 2002, when I hired Uma Maheshwari to help with ‘content’ — we had no concept of design research at that time. Along with my ‘secretary’ Malini Munisamaiah who had found her, we became a three-person team, and so, in theory, an ‘organization.’

When I’d set out I really wasn’t sure how design and social research could or should fit together. We hadn’t created the innovation cycle or any of the innovation training documents that we later developed. We didn’t have a multi-terabit archive or a blog or any kind of track record or network of alumni who have graduated on from CKS to other things in life. We hadn’t developed any of the insights, understandings or approaches that now characterize the ‘CKS Way.’

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Imagination at Work

What is your preferred way of leaving a meeting, by fireman pole or by slide? Companies that work in the realm of creative innovation have designed environments for their employees that encourage imagination, activity, and fun.

Lego’s Denmark office is such an example. The design of the open ground floor, scattered with couches and Lego displays, encourages interaction amongst designers during the creative process. And when business meetings must take place upstairs, the slide provides a quick get away.

Lego’s employment philosophy is intrinsically tied to their product, proclaiming that, “Creativity is at the heart of the LEGO Group. So we build it systematically into everything we do. In the same playful and highly imaginative way that children transform a pile of bricks into a jumbo jet or a fairytale palace, we bring imagination to work everyday – in the way we go about our jobs, our experience-based approach to learning and our inventive career development.”
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WikiLeaks, State Secrets, and Trust in Government

When WikiLeaks released hundreds of thousands of classified documents on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and State Department memos, the world was forced to consider, How much do we trust our governments?

WikiLeaks, a whistleblowing website, says “We believe that transparency in government activities leads to reduced corruption, better government, and stronger democracies. All governments can benefit from increased scrutiny by the world community, as well as their own people. We believe this scrutiny requires information.” In the past, WikiLeaks had published information on pollution dumping off the coast of Kenya, a video of an American helicopter attack in Baghdad that killed twelve people, including two Reuter’s journalists, protocol in Guantanamo Bay, and e-mails from Sarah Palin’s personal account. The more recent classified documents and diplomatic cables were published in coordination with major newspapers, such as Le Monde, El Pais, Der Speigel, and The Guardian (who shared with the New York Times).
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CKS works with Sam Pitroda and the NInC towards a Centre of Design Innovation

February 1, 2012. New Delhi. The National Innovation Council, headed by Sam Pitroda, is working on building twenty educational centers across India that focus on Design and Innovation. In order to accomplish this, they invited several relevant entities, of which CKS is one, to present their ideas and provide their expertise for constructing such a center. CKS presented its proposal for one of these centers today, and looks forward to knowing the outcome.

Arun Maira Joins Board of Advisors for Design!publiC

February 1, 2012. New Delhi. Arun Maira, member of the National Planning Commission of the Government of India, has just agreed to join the Board of Advisors for Design Public. Speaking on the focus topic for this edition of the Design Public Conclave, “Trust, Participation, Innovation,” Mr. Maira said that these themes are key priorities for him and for the National Planning Commission.

Fashion with a Breath of Fresh Air

We all wear them: Clothes. We use them to keep warm, exercise, define ourselves, make political statements, but can we also use them to clean up our environment? In an unlikely collaboration, successful fashion designer Helen Storey and polymer chemist Tony Ryan have collaborated to create the world’s first air purifying clothing.


 
 
 
The science has already been used to create self-cleaning windows and paints. When nanoparticles of titanium dioxide come into contact with ultraviolet light, it causes pollutants to break down. By applying this to clothing, this technology can clean the air as we move through it, especially in urban areas, where pollution can cause severe health problems.

 
 
 

What is innovative about Catalytic Clothing, however, is not just the science, but also the democracy of the idea. Rather than attaching the technology to a specific brand, Catalytic Clothing is working with Ecover, a company that makes ecologically friendly cleaning products, to be sold as a fabric softener. Instead of needing a new wardrobe, your existing clothes can be transformed into mobile air purifiers when they are washed. Professor Helen Storey told CNN, “We are empowering people’s existing wardrobes with a technology that will allow them to have a significant impact on the quality of air we breathe.”

the technology works particularly well on jeans

Catylitic Clothing expects to be on the market in the next two years, and is putting forth a series of cultural and artistic demonstrations, such as the “Field of Jeans,” above, to raise awareness about how science and fashion have collaborated to create environmental innovation.

Designing for Change

That human society is now capable of altering the climate of our earth is broadly known, but how are these changes going to affect the structure of human society? The UK’s Hadley Center for Climate Prevention and Research at the Met Office recently released a report, Climate: Observations, Projections, and Impacts, detailing the predicted changes in weather patterns around the world and the effect those will have on the economy, geography, and pattern of society.


Higher levels of flooding, extreme heat, and water shortages, all predicted if climate change proceeds unchecked, meaning that more and more people will move from rural to urban areas in search of jobs and refuge from more extreme natural cycles. However, cities too will face challenges, and will need to design infrastructure to cope with the earth’s changes.

 

Traditionally, design for weather has not been a priority in urban planning compared to economic development and maintaining high standards of living. For example, coastal cities, which were established for their proximity to ports and waterways, have evolved with economic intention and have not been designed to face changing levels of flooding caused by these economic activities. While the original urban designs may be achieving their material goals, they do so while creating larger problems. Dr. David Dodman, from the International Institute for Environment and Development told CNN, “In places like Delhi, we’re seeing a growing middle class use their wealth to pay for electricity-hungry air-conditioning units, which contribute to global warming, and this of course creates a negative feedback loop.”

Cheonggyecheon River in Downtown Seoul, part of Seoul's Urban Renewal Project

Some cities are, however, redesigning their urban areas with climate change in mind. Seoul is a notable example, where urban designers have undone prior projects, bringing back to the surface an ancient river that had been buried during South Korea’s rapid economic advancement. Simon Reddy explains that, “This creates a wind corridor to it keep cool, and will also help drain water away in times of high rainfall.” Other urban redesign projects include rooftop gardens, which insulate buildings in the winter, keep them cool in the summer, and absorb rainfall, as well as being an oasis of green in an urban jungle.

Climate change, its immediate and secondary effects, require a redesign of urban spaces to accommodate more extreme weather patterns and subsequent migration and change in social patterns. Some cities have joined to create the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group, and are already working on projects to simultaneously counter and design for global climate change. The challenge of climate change will take forethought, innovation, and creativity to redesign our cities, our patterns of living, and our societal mentalities.