ColourNext Dialogues in New Delhi: An Overview

The second edition of ColourNext Dialogues, a discussion on the trends identified in Asian Paint’s ColourNext project for 2012, was held in Delhi on February 28th. Fashion designers, artists, architects, interior designers, and students met for an evening to interact with the ideas, give their critiques, and discuss the social trends behind the colour palettes.

To open the event, Anand Vijayan of CKS, spoke about the inspiration for ColourNext Dialogues, and the opportunity to look deeper into the colour trends for real meaning. Ekta Ohri, head of projects at CKS, invited participants to talk about their own relationship with colour. Some professionals spoke about their use of colour in design and art, and observed a growing trend to more neutral, blank colours. Several participants spoke about colour as the first and primary means of communication with the world, making colour the defining aspect in an object’s identity. Whether professionals, students, or neither, all the participants enjoyed colour as more than a visual experience. They spoke about how colour as an expression reflects mood, emotion, and even personal identity.
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Agenda for ColourNext Dialogues 2012

As we mentioned in a post earlier this week, the Center for Knowledge Societies is collaborating with Asian Paints in organizing an event, ColourNext Dialogues 2012, a a first of its kind conclave on colour trends, forecasting and visual directions in Indian society. The conclave, to be held at a restored mill in Byculla, Mumbai on January 24th, 2012, will be an intensive half-day discussion on the visual significance of observed and predicted social trends.

Speakers will Include

text frau sucht mann demi moore dating ex father dating gemini female rencontrer des filles new york commute for dating lol riot matchmaking Check This Out This Site dating a girl who drinks till she passes out go to this web-site Shimul Javeri Kadri, Principal Architect, SJK Architects
M.P. Ranjan, Design Thinker and Independent Academic
Aparna Piramal Raje, Columnist, LiveMint
Nien Sao, Colour Specialist and HoD Fashion Dept., Pearl Academy
Wasim Khan, Director, Lemon Design
Valerie Bonnardel, Reader in Experimental Psychology, University of Winchester
Sarita Sundar, Partner, Trapezestudios

The event, moderated by Dr. Aditya Dev Sood, will begin with a walk through the installation spaces, in order to introduce the themes to participants. This will be followed by discussions on the visual, especially colour-related, significance of each of these themes. An agenda for the day is provided below:

10:30 – 11:00 Installation Space Walkthrough

11:00 – 11:10 Welcome address by Aditya Dev Sood

11:10 – 11:20 An Introduction to Colour Next and its Objectives by Mr. Joshua Karthik

11:20 – 11:40 A Dialogic Approach to Colour Trends

11:40 – 12:00 Presentations of Themes by Sneha Raman, CKS

12:00 – 12:30 Interactive Session on Themes

12:30 – 13:50 Panel Discussions on each Theme

13:50 – 14:00 Closing Note and Invitation to Lunch

Participation at ColourNext Dialogues is by invitation only. However, if you are interested in attending, please contact Vedika Khanna at cks@cks.in

What Happens When It Rains?

It’s been pouring cats and dogs in Bombay. Roads are flooded, potholes are rapidly multiplying, and traffic has come to a standstill. Or at least been reduced to a very slow crawl. Meanwhile, Hurricane Irene continues to wind its way along the east coast of the United States, causing flash floods, destroying valuable property and necessitating evacuation.

All this begs the question: what are the design consequences of climate change? How can we design our cities to better deal with the climate? Leave alone unpredictable climate change, what about predictable, regular weather like the monsoon, which happens every year. How is it that a city which experiences the monsoons every year for four months still lacks the infrastructure to function smoothly during those soggy months?

What happens when it rains in Bombay? All kinds of hastily put together jugaad-baaz infrastructure is seen to fall apart; minor indents in roads become huge gaping puddles; standard routes get clogged as underpasses become flooded and impossible to navigate. While people are quite adaptable, and can be seen wading through knee-deep water in flooded areas, their vehicles cannot. Cars and scooters are forced to take alternate routes, and massive traffic jams are quite common during these months.

Maybe a user-centered redesign could help solve some of these issues and lead to better designed cities – not even necessarily to make them more live-able, but simply more functional. On the other hand, it could be that cities need to be designed like airports, with modern, state-of-the-art design solutions. But somehow, it doesn’t seem likely that that would work – you can design an airport to be quietly efficient and smooth-functioning using technology and high design, but not whole cities, especially not the delightfully chaotic cities of India.

Maybe solutions for such problems need to be more context-specific. They could perhaps be derived from the experiences of those living there, experiencing and dealing with those problems on a regular basis. Perhaps documenting the consequences of the monsoon in a new way could be a first step towards this: real-time videos of traffic jams due to the rain, or more visual imagery of how people navigate the flooded streets, or city-wide mapping of flooded areas to avert traffic jams.

Is such a user-centric approach at all possible and/or helpful in redesigning our cities? What kinds of approaches could we take to make this happen effectively?