Nurturing Risk is Essential to Innovation

click here Jacob Koshy, in a recent WSJ article, wrote about how, despite the fact that India has been labelled as a nation of innovators and has embarked on a self-declared decade of innovation, this is only true in the loosest sense of the word. Most often, examples of so-called ‘Indian innovation’ are limited to improvising, tinkering, and quick-fix solutions – in other words, jugaad. Koshy observes:

enter site …apart from the immediate, simplistic appeal that this tinkering or ‘jugaad,’ presents—of a poor, uneducated villager developing a water-bicycle that can be pedaled across a river, or a school dropout fashioning a pedal pump-powered washing machine—we rarely hear of these mavericks improving on their designs, or licensing their work to a company.

http://ramblingroseboutique.com/?prertwe=dating-a-man-with-a-controlling-ex-wife&973=3a Why is there such a failure in translating these creative improvisations into successful, marketable innovations that add real value? [Read more…]

On the Relationship between Trust and Innovation

http://vagnvagensbygg.se/firmenit/5307

n1 rencontre ado As Design Public III inches ever closer, we’ve been trying to articulate, and more deeply understand for ourselves, what we mean by Trust, Participation and Innovation, and how they relate to each other. Over the next weeks, we will be sharing our thoughts and research on these questions, the first of which is concerned with trust and how it relates to creativity, and by extension, innovation.

see source Why Trust?

go site This past year has been rife with protest, from the Ram Lila grounds to Tahrir Square and Zucotti Park, all of which appear to have sprung from a breakdown in trust: society, or the public at large, seems to have lost faith in their governments as well as private corporations, no longer trusting that these entities are working in their interest. This breakdown in society’s trust in its largest, most long-standing institutions is a crisis with very wide-ranging consequences in the social as well political sphere.

http://www.topcanon.fr/figase/opie/3785 Anna Hazare en route to Ram Lila grounds

http://celebritysex.cz/?triores=dating-agency-financial-times&817=b2 At CKS, however, we are most concerned with how this crisis of trust impacts innovation, which as we see it, is twofold. [Read more…]

Experience Based Design: Healthcare

http://lokoli.com/?rtyt=annonce-site-de-rencontre-original&f08=cd Public institutions are often criticized as being bureaucratic, inefficient, or ineffective at fulfilling the purposes they are designed to do, compared with private, user-centric, industries. Often in the case of public institutions, individuals have no opportunity to choose a better product, as is the case in the private sector. That therefore leaves little incentive to innovate the design of public services. However initiatives are not absent. ThinkPublic, a social design agency, has worked with hospitals in the UK to redesign the National Health Service to become a more patient-centered public service. Their experience based design methodology involves individuals’ experiences, existing and aspirational, in the design process. Interviews, videos, photographs, journals, and web blogs of patients, carers, and hospital staff have all been used to design new, patient-centered, solutions for several difficult areas of health care, while simultaneously encouraging patients, carers, and staff to work together to address problems.
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Designing Communities for Social Sustainability

slums in Mumbai

Population growth is going to have profound impacts on politics, economics, and society in the coming decades, one issue being the basic question: Where are we going to put these people? “UN surveys indicate that…by 2030 over two billion people in the world will be living in slums, with the associated problems of poor sanitation, and access to healthcare and education,” reports a paper put forth by Future Communities. Some cities have been addressing the issues of poverty and expanding slums by creating brand new empty settlements developed in anticipation of population growth. However some initiatives are aspiring for more than economic, or even environmental, viability; they are designing communicative, relational, and trust-building communities.
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Design Public III: Why We Focus on Trust, Participation and Innovation

Design Public began as a conversation around the question of how design thinking and innovation can be used by organizations and actors outside the private sector, specifically government organizations and social sector agencies. As we enter this third edition of the Design Public Conclave, we see not only that our questions and deliberations have become so much more sophisticated, layered and granular, but also that there is a clear need to move beyond mere conversation, to the actual establishment of diverse consortia, partnerships and alliances that will bring this agenda to practical realization.

At our first conclave in Delhi, we focused on the question of Governance Innovation: Can or should government agencies use user-centered design solutions to develop and deploy better solutions? The easy answer is yes, but the question remains, where can we find the special expertise that allows them to do this? Out of this question was born the concept of what we call the Bihar Innovation Lab. [Read more…]

IBM Officially On Board as Sponsor for Design Public

We’re elated to report that yesterday, IBM officially confirmed their sponsorship of the third edition of the Design Public Conclave. Our CEO, Dr. Aditya Dev Sood, has been in conversation with the folks at IBM for the past month or so now, discussing areas of mutual interest and opportunities for collaboration. The focus of the conclave is on how governments as well as private corporations can increase trust in the public sphere, and in doing so help build a culture of innovation in India. IBM has been at the helm of innovation in several different arenas, and most recently have been focused on urban infrastructure and smart cities, highly relevant themes in the context of building more trust and participation through better design and innovation.

Smart Cities are cities that know how to “leverage information, anticipate problems and coordinate resources.” The smartest cities integrate and coordinate between all key functions and infrastructures. [Read more…]

Political Participation and Trust in Ancient Athens

By Ayesha Vemuri and Sedona Chinn

The foundations of western democracy and political thought lie in the ancient Athenian democracy. Their institutions are the roots from which modern governments have grown. Therefore, as Design!publiC III explores modern phenomena of political participation and trust, it stands to reason that Athenian understandings, as the ancestor to modern democracy, be likewise understood.

[Read more…]

WikiLeaks, State Secrets, and Trust in Government

When WikiLeaks released hundreds of thousands of classified documents on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and State Department memos, the world was forced to consider, How much do we trust our governments?

WikiLeaks, a whistleblowing website, says “We believe that transparency in government activities leads to reduced corruption, better government, and stronger democracies. All governments can benefit from increased scrutiny by the world community, as well as their own people. We believe this scrutiny requires information.” In the past, WikiLeaks had published information on pollution dumping off the coast of Kenya, a video of an American helicopter attack in Baghdad that killed twelve people, including two Reuter’s journalists, protocol in Guantanamo Bay, and e-mails from Sarah Palin’s personal account. The more recent classified documents and diplomatic cables were published in coordination with major newspapers, such as Le Monde, El Pais, Der Speigel, and The Guardian (who shared with the New York Times).
[Read more…]

Arun Maira Joins Board of Advisors for Design!publiC

February 1, 2012. New Delhi. Arun Maira, member of the National Planning Commission of the Government of India, has just agreed to join the Board of Advisors for Design Public. Speaking on the focus topic for this edition of the Design Public Conclave, “Trust, Participation, Innovation,” Mr. Maira said that these themes are key priorities for him and for the National Planning Commission.

SOPA, PIPA, and the Crisis of Trust

Yesterday saw a ‘blackout’ of several popular websites, including Wikipedia and Reddit, whilst other popular websites like Google and Craigslist displayed messages on their homepages, protesting against two separate anti-censorship bills, the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the Protect IP [Intellectual Property] Act (PIPA).

Both are meant to attack the problem of foreign Web sites that sell pirated or counterfeit goods. They would impose restrictions forcing U.S. companies to stop selling online ads to suspected pirates, processing payments for illegal online sales and refusing to list websites suspected of piracy in search-engine results. But, protesters say, the bills would actually do very little to prevent piracy and illegal websites, and instead may result in the extreme censorship and even takedown of websites that rely on user-generated content, like Wikipedia or YouTube.

The protest is the first of its kind, where some of the most visited websites on the internet have voiced their discontent with the proposed law. Social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter, while having issued statements against the two laws, have been noticeably absent from the protests, aside from a status update by Mark Zuckerberg:

The internet is the most powerful tool we have for creating a more open and connected world. We can’t let poorly thought out laws get in the way of the internet’s development. Facebook opposes SOPA and PIPA, and we will continue to oppose any laws that will hurt the internet.

The world today needs political leaders who are pro-internet. We have been working with many of these folks for months on better alternatives to these current proposals. I encourage you to learn more about these issues and tell your congressmen that you want them to be pro-internet.

This points to the larger issue of trust, and the lack of it, that is apparent in these legislations. Curbing access to the internet, censoring online content and preventing free expression (singing a cover of your favorite song on a YouTube video would be made illegal under these laws) only leads to discontent and a greater crisis of trust. Like in the recent episode in Egypt where the government attempted to block internet connectivity, citizens are left with little illusion about the government’s protection of their rights to information and expression.